22.11.16

South Korean cabinet approves closer intelligence cooperation with Japan

In a move that highlights the thaw in relations between South Korea and Japan, the two nations appear to be closer than ever to entering an intelligence agreement with each other. In 2014, Washington, Seoul and Tokyo signed a trilateral intelligence-sharing agreement on regional security issues, with the United States acting as an intermediary. But a proposed new agreement between South Korea and Japan would remove the US from the equation and would facilitate direct intelligence-sharing between the two East Asian nations for the first time in history. The proposed treaty is known as the General Security of Military Information Agreement (GSOMIA). Its centerpiece is a proposal to streamline the rapid exchange of intelligence between South Korean and Japanese spy agencies, especially in times of regional crisis involving North Korea. Last week, the South Korean Ministry of National Defense publicly gave GSOMIA its blessing by stating that Seoul’s security would benefit from access to intelligence from Japanese satellite reconnaissance as well as from submarine activity in the South Sea. On Monday, South Korea’s Deputy Prime Minister for Economic Affairs, Yoo Il-ho, announced after a cabinet meeting that GSOMIA had been officially approved by the government.

The agreement is surprising, given the extremely tense history of Korean-Japanese relations. Japan conquered the Korean Peninsula for most of the first half of the 20th century, facing stiff resistance from local guerrilla groups. After the end of World War II and Japan’s capitulation, South Korea has sought reparations from Tokyo. In 2014, after many decades of pressure, Japan struck a formal agreement with South Korea over the plight of the so-called “comfort women”, thousands of South Korean women and girls who were forced into prostitution by the Japanese imperial forces during World War II. Relations between the two regional rivals have improved steadily since that time. The GSOMIA agreement will now be forwarded to officials in the South Korean Ministry of National Defense. The country’s defense minister is expected to sign it during a meeting with the Japanese ambassador to South Korea in Seoul on Wednesday, local news media reported.

Ian Allen
https://intelnews.org/2016/11/22/01-2013/

ΣΧΟΛΙΟ "ΙΣΧΥΣ": ΚΑΙ ΚΑΠΩΣ ΕΤΣΙ ΟΙ ΣΙΝΕΣ ΘΑ ΑΠΟΚΤΗΣΟΥΝ ΠΡΟΣΒΑΣΗ ΚΑΙ ΣΤΙΣ ΥΠΗΡΕΣΙΕΣ ΤΗΣ ΙΑΠΩΝΙΑΣ. ΟΧΙ ΑΜΕΣΩΣ, ΧΡΕΙΑΖΕΤΑΙ ΠΡΩΤΑ ΝΑ ΧΤΙΣΟΥΝ ΕΜΠΙΣΤΟΣΥΝΗ, ΚΑΤΙ ΘΑ ΤΟΥΣ "ΤΑΙΣΟΥΝ" ΣΤΗΝ ΑΡΧΗ, ΚΑΤΙ ΠΟΥ ΘΑ ΑΠΟΔΟΣΕΙ ΑΡΚΕΤΑ ΓΙΑ ΤΟΥΣ ΙΑΠΩΝΕΣ (ΑΥΤΟΤΡΑΥΜΑΤΙΣΜΟΣ ΣΕ ΜΗ ΖΩΤΙΚΟ ΚΟΜΜΑΤΙ ΓΙΑ ΤΟΥΣ ΣΙΝΕΣ) ΚΑΙ ΜΕΤΑ ...

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